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Nature’s Larder – my collection

Thinking, thinking, thinking, that’s how I used half of my time today. I spent the morning on Google looking for information about fruit and vegtables. Some of the things I found were interesting, a lady that makes dresses that look like vegtables, a guy who takes amazing photographs of vegtables under a microscope, another guy who lights up fruits and to top it off Louise Gardiner who sews beautiful embroideries that feature fruits and vegtables.

This piece just blows me away, has me running for cover and worrying will I ever be this good? Edit

 

 

   

Then I decide its time to stop clinging to my iphone and to start looking at books for inspiration, I read about fruits and how they’ve played a part in folk lore and how fruits with seeds are a sign of fertility and self potential. This idea stuck with me. Along with the thought that a fruit or vegtable is the culmination of the plant’s process. From here the cycle continues. I’ve always been facinated by falling leaves and was caught by one comment I read today about how many trees and plants release leaves to soften the ground on which their fruits will fall, so they are attractive to animals and birds who will carry the seeds unwittingly to places they can transplant and grow. Here is all aspects of this living thing working together to ensure the species survives. I started to think of my vision of nature’s larder as more delicate, more gentle but with strength. It should include things with 2 sides to them; in essence strong but also having more simple qualities. I thought about the leaves of cabbages, slim and textured but when eaten strong and effective. Especially on my tummy. The tough, hard pips of apples held inside soft juicy fruit. Hard brown twigs of cinnamon with their light scent and sweet flavour.

So off I went on a scavange hunt.

  
And, this is what I found. An apple with a beautiful centre, holding safe a little pip, some delicate green cabbage leaves and its denser but plainer coloured white cousin. A tough shell which was once home to an oyster. Then some cinnamon and some seeds I bought home from Moroccco, they are a variety of tea (I promise) and have a small solid pip inside a tactile almost fabric like collar. And finally an aging, dried tulip, the pollen and seeds of which were still vibrant despite the decay of the petals and stem.  I layed then on a piece of orange tissue, bright like the sun but made of strong, man made lutrador.

It was important to me that the colours worked well together even though I know this assignment is about the textures, lines and shapes I stood back and looked to see if I had gathered enough items to enable me to start the mark making and recording style drawings required. I took more photographs to focus on the textures and to identify areas that would lend themselves well to examination and duplication.

   
       
I was satisfied that I had sufficent possibilites but had found myself drawn again to colour and how it worked in each shot/composition. 

   
   

A few black and white edits took away the distractions and I was pleasantly surprised by the variation in tone between the items. The colour’s no longer distracted me but my tea did and in particular a leek, not the whole leek just a circular cross section. So I added a few to the collection.

   

     

This has been a wonderful exercise, very enjoyable. Ive learnt that it’s not always necessary to be elaborate in your search for items of interest and value. Keep it simple.
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