ATV - Ex 4.2 - Experimental yarns & concepts · ATV - Part 4 - Yarn & it's Manufacture · ATV - Part 4 - Yarn and Linear Exploration · ATV - Pt4 - Pj1 - Exploring Lines · Textiles 1: A Textiles Vocabulary · Uncategorized

Constraints of Colour

The next part of ATV and development of yarn concepts has taken me into the world of colour. I am far more used to letting colour develop, its rarely my starting point unless of course I’ve picked some beautiful threads or fabric and I’ve linked their choice by colour.

I had to select one of my colour textile studies completed in the previous project; I chose this study because I have always been fascinated by the colour palette and intrigued by how the selection worked together in a slightly unsettling way.

It didn’t take me long to gather together a huge pile of thread, yarns and more unusual elements to use to make the yarn concepts.

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Let me just say that making yarns is fiddly, one of the most fiddly things I’ve ever done. The visions in my head of the yarns I would like to make soon prove to be too difficult or complicated to work through so I decided to keep the colour explorations very simple.

It was lovely winding the different threads around a centre made out of stiffened mulberry twine. I could see plenty of uses for these ‘threads’ to make 3D pieces and to use on stitched pieces; couched down to fill large areas in a more interesting way than simply using close stitches.

I was very surprised that the individual colours from the colour palette worked together well in different combinations, I always thought it was the full combination that made it work.

These 2 concept yarns I actually made before I did the simple colour combinations but I soon felt that these fitted more into the ‘unusual materials’ category.

The little leaf piece was worked using a dark brown synthetic fabric, I cut it roughly but wasn’t satisfied with the result; the fabric was too floppy and looked unfinished. To remedy this I mixed some Pavapol (a textile hardening agent) with some Stewart Gill textile paint and painted and modeled and leaves in to more pleasing shapes.

I used the orange fabric beads to replicate the circles in the original textile piece and worked at including all of the colours in the colour palette. I like the thin outlines in this extension painting that I did so used slender pieces of white and yellow to replicate those links.

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After a detour back to make the four colour combination yarn concepts I went back to translating the colour palette using unusual materials. I’d been looking for ways to include feathers into my work without them becoming twee or passe, I’m not completely sure I have accomplished my mission but I have used some feathers and I like the result.

The final piece is worked using beads, metal wire and some thin threads sewed in and out of the twisted base.

Once I get started I find that I can run easily with these challenges, it’s taken me a long time to see the potential of making my own yarns and threads. I would never have thought of doing this; I might have bought new threads, or even dyed some threads but I would never have gone down this route. This is why even when I feel like throwing in the hat and admitting that I’ve bitten off far more than I can chew I keep going. I fight down this urge to bow out because I am learning so much and when I do concentrate I love every minute of this course.

2 thoughts on “Constraints of Colour

  1. You are creating amazing concept yarns. I particularly like the pumpkin beads. Don’t throw it in. Your work is inspirational and the world needs your eye.

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  2. Glad to have you on my side doing these challenges. It is when the going gets tough the the goodie stuff comes out. I think these yarn speak of the original source very well plus they are very personal and thus super interesting to look at.

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