Art · ATV - Ex 4.3 - Re-interpret, re-invent · ATV - Part 4 - Yarn and Linear Exploration · ATV - Pt4 - Pj2 - Creating Linear Forms · Textiles 1: A Textiles Vocabulary

Exercise 4.3 – using more unusual materials.

Whilst I was happy with the crochet samples I still felt they weren’t as inventive as they could be so I decided to include some unusual materials in the knitting samples. 

I started very simply by including some merino fibre tops and knitting through it with mohair threads using a variety of needle widths. The tops puff up nicely and add lots of texture.


This still was not unusual enough so I thought it might be nice to include some textured paper that I have with holes in so that the needles could be put through the wholes and then yarns could be worked into the paper.

At times this was a little scary because the paper had a tendency to seperate and the holes disappeared. The end result wasn’t as long and thin as the previous samples but it does still have a linear feel to it. I like the bright colours and at they are off set by the white paper.


Finally I found a metal bar that I had rescued from a burnt out car, it was quite cold and not on fire at the time, and with a lot of fumbling I managed to knit around the bar, again using a variety of thicknesses of yarn and some more silk that frays beautifully. 


There was quite a long tail of the yellow sari silk so I found another piece of rescued metal and tied it at the bottom of the knitted area. I’m really quite pleased with this last sample, it’s unusual and has a complex but complementary mixture of textures.

Art · ATV - Choices & Planning · ATV - Ex 4.3 - Re-interpret, re-invent · ATV - Part 4 - Yarn and Linear Exploration · ATV - Reflections · Textiles 1: A Textiles Vocabulary

Let’s Play!!

I’ve decided that I’m not satisfied with the samples I’ve made for Ex4.3 so I’m going to have a play. 

This is my colour scheme source.


So I’ve collected a load of yarns in the similar colours, I’ve used most of the specific yarns up with the unsatisfactory samples.


My plan is to go back to some line making techniques that I am comfortable with; crochet and knitting and I’m going to have some fun seeing how far I can take the yarns using as many silly stitches as I can. 

I really want to get back into my working territory so that my mind can run more wild. At least if these samples don’t work I will have had a good time making them!

Happy weekend everyone. 

Art · ATV - Ex 4.3 - Re-interpret, re-invent · ATV - Part 4 - Yarn & it's Manufacture · ATV - Pt4 - Pj2 - Creating Linear Forms · Textiles 1: A Textiles Vocabulary

Re-interpret, re-invent. Explorations

After doing the design work I decided I’d do some samples using an overhand knot technique that is used to make strings with buttons. So ploughing on forgetting that I should be using one of the 3 techniques I had previously learnt I started making samples.

I selected buttons and yarns with the same colours as the ones I’d used in the colour wraps. I really quite liked the results, the colours worked together well but I felt they were too simple and there was nothing new or exciting about them.

Using my sketchbook I worked up a few more inventive designs.


And then using the yarns from the original yarn wraps I worked up a couple of samples.


Again these didn’t fill me with excitement, they were starting to meet the brief but they didn’t say anything about me and had very little evidence of my style.


I think this sample is far more me, I like both sides of the piece but I didn’t feel that they reflected back to the original yarn wraps enough.


This sample started to look more fun and interesting and I like the explosion of colour. It was at this point that as I looked back at the samples to decide which features of the samples appeals to me most and I looked at the ripple effect created by the threading of the yarn through the button/felt that I remembered I was meant to be using the new techniques.

So for the last sample I used the three stick weaving technique and the lovely textured clumps of Oliver Twist threads that I had used briefly in the yarn wraps to make a very bright and chunky exploration. 


I’m really not sure that I have reached a satisfactory conclusion to this exercise by I am going to move onto the next exercise and if I feel I need to I will go back and revisit the requirements.

Art · ATV - Choices & Planning · ATV - Ex 4.3 - Re-interpret, re-invent · ATV - Part 4 - Yarn & it's Manufacture · ATV - Part 4 - Yarn and Linear Exploration · Textiles 1: A Textiles Vocabulary

Re-interpret, re-invent. Design and Planning

Although this exercise called for the use of the colour wraps from Part 3 I wasn’t quite sure how to start this exercise so I decided to gather some ideas together about the colour wraps and do a review of what I had done so far in my sketchbook.


As I reached the end of this review I decided that I wanted to look to my flower paintings from Part 2, they have a luxurious feeling and I wanted to use them as the source for the shaping of the linear samples. 

Again I worked in my sketchbook and looked for some suitable shapes and referring this back to my book of knotting techniques to match the designs with a suitable technique. It’s only now as I look back I realise I’d forgotten I was meant to use the techniques I had previously tried. Doh!


Art · ATV - Ex 4.3 - Re-interpret, re-invent · ATV - Part 4 - Yarn & it's Manufacture · ATV - Pt4 - Pj2 - Creating Linear Forms · Textiles 1: A Textiles Vocabulary

Trying New Techniques 

I already know how to knit and crochet but there are plenty more ways to make cords and strings. It was fun looking for techniques to try and slightly scary because I’d need to at least learn the very basics of the ones I chose.

Firstly I had a go at stick weaving. It’s very simple and the technique gives you a lovely restful ripple effect. I did 2 samples: the first with three sticks and the second with five. I did a little bit of experimentation with yarn choices.


Macramé was the first word in the table of techniques in the course materials that appealed to me, it caused two feelings, one of dread: wasn’t it naff, old fashioned? And one of interest: is there potential here? Could new things be created from this dated technique? 

None of my fluffy yarns were suitable for macramé on their own so I made a sample using a thick yarn as a base with thin fabric strips to make the knots. I also made a sample completely with the fabric strips. Both samples worked okay but the fabric tends to fray and this distracts from the knotting. They look better in the close up photographs.


Lastly I had a go at french knitting, this is a very restful technique and it was nice to see that you could add in various yarns to give different effect. I particularly liked these strings, they were soft and springy.