Art · ATV - Part 5 - Building a collection · ATV - Part 5 - PJ 2 - Building a Response · ATV - Pt5 - PJ2 - Identify & present a colour palette · Textiles 1: A Textiles Vocabulary

ATV 5 – Building a Response – colour palette – pt2

Once I’d decided on my colour palette I started to think about materials and proportions.

First I selected some paints that I felt matched the ones I had in my head.


A lovely friend had reminded me that my choices had a very Mondrian feeling to them. 

I found this particularly interesting quote from the man, Piet Mondrian, himself:

I construct lines and color combinations , in order to express general beauty with the utmost awareness. Nature (or, that which I see) inspires me, puts me, as with any painter, in an emotional state so that an urge comes about to make something, but I want to come as close as possible to the truth and abstract everything from that, until I reach the foundation (still just an external foundation!) of thingsā€¦

I believe it is possible that, through horizontal and vertical lines constructed with awareness, but not with calculation, led by high intuition, and brought to harmony and rhythm, these basic forms of beauty, supplemented if necessary by other direct lines or curves, can become a work of art, as strong as it is true.


And, it looks like not only his colour choices appeal to me. I love his views on abstraction coming from truth and his ability to create simple beauty from complex forms like nature.

My colour palette comes from very simple sources; the black and white from the shadows on the smocks, then the blue and yellow from smocks made from denim, or serge. A fabric very similar to denim from France. In Belgium the walloons wear blue smocks as part of their national outfit.

After deciding on the colours, I looked at proportions and selected the bold, contrasting white and black as the main colours with blue and yellow as a smaller elements to add interest.


My time completing Part 4 of ATV and making yarn/linear concepts has left me with an interest in reusing old materials, especially in the form of thread. Either as recycled yarns or threads that I have pulled from fabric and weaves.

I chose some provisional materials and then ordered some beautiful recycled yarns from YarnYarn

Art · ATV - Part 5 - Building a collection · ATV - Part 5 - PJ 2 - Building a Response · ATV - Pt5 - PJ2 - Be inspired by an artist or designer · ATV - Pt5 - PJ2 - Identify & present a colour palette · Textiles 1: A Textiles Vocabulary

ATV 5 – Building a Response – Colour Palette – pt1

This was a relatively easy decision. I already knew that I wanted to work with colours that make a striking contrast between light and dark. I didn’t want colours that had too much range and were likely to be miss read.  Think of all the different shades and tones of pink! At some point I think my hair has probably been most of those!


When making colour choices I often look to the subject matter for inspiration, but with the smocks I had already done that in Part 2 and after looking at colour palettes in far more detail in part 3 I thought I might look further for inspiration. 

This I duly did until it just became evident to me that the best colours to create the perfect contrast were black and white.  Not the most exciting but it feels right. 

So I had a little look round Pinterest and found 3 that I think use black and white to great effect:

Firstly Dianne Firth, this master art quilter lives in Australia and makes beautiful quilts using very limited colour palettes and strong solid shapes.

I’m also very taken with Marina Kamenskaya and this beautiful quilt of horizontal lines, they make me think of Kandinsky and the mighty Joan Miro. Such wonderful artists that were able to make sense of their worlds by stripping back to the bare lines, highlights and shadows. 


Finally I’ve been drawn to the work of Elizabeth Barton and particularly this piece that uses black and white to great effect. I really like this but I do think it’s drawing me back into a more detailed approach and not the bold repetitive effect that I am looking for.


Red and yellow are often used as the contrasts for black and white and they work very well being good primary colours. So just to bring a little variety I have decided to use blue, the other primary colour with yellow.

I’m going to be working on my capsule collection during the winter months and black, white, blue and a flash of yellow feel like the perfect colours for dark nights and short days of frost, blue skies and sharp sun.