Art · MMT - Part 1 - Surface Distortion · MMT - Pt1 - Pj3 - Ex3 - Using Hot Water · MMT - Pt1 - Project 3 - Heating & Fusing · Textiles 1 - Mixed Media for Textiles

MMT – Pt1 – Pj3 – Ex3 – Using Hot Water – Part 3

The one thing about this strange bubbly mounded bits of synthetic shiny material is that they work really well when put over another strong interesting surface. If like me you like looking at things from different angles and indifferent lighting situations then this is perfect for you.

I laid one of the samples over a piece of bright yello scrim. The shadows are really appealing. The shapes are very random and fractured but if you keep manipulating the pile of fabric you get some intriguing structures.


Laid out on flat scrim works well too. They look like thin clouds at sunset.



After taking some photos I ran one of the pictures through some iPhone photo editing apps and came up with a couple of interesting results. The apps defined the lines (with a view to finding areas to draw) and added some sweet extras,

 There are textile possibilities here, both to work with the original fabrics and to replicate the marks and shapes with stitch.


As before I returned to my sketchbook and made some effort into recording the textural qualities of the samples and capturing the chaos created by all the different lines, textures and shadows. I also had a go at simplifying the lines and working with some colour.

Art · MMT - Part 1 - Surface Distortion · MMT - Pt1 - Pj3 - Ex3 - Using Hot Water · MMT - Pt1 - Project 3 - Heating & Fusing

MMT – Pt1 – Pj3 – Ex3 – Using Hot Water – Part 2

Not deterred by my first disastrous attempt at moulding with hot water I decided to take a more restrained approach to my next foray.

I only wrapped a few items, using a nice dependable cotton thread.


I have to admit to one mistake, just to be all edgy and interesting I included a couple of oxtail bones. And yes they did make the water all sticky and fatty. It was not pleasant but luckily it did wash off … eventually.


The little pebbles in a row came out okay, the moulding was good and clear and they were nice and springy.

 The only problem was they gave me the creeps! All bubbly like the scum you sometimes see on the beach, or jellyfish – not elegantly swimming about but rotting and sickly looking on a beach after the tides gone out.

Could they be rescued with felt? I’d done some wet felting on lacy fabric to make some nuno felt.


Did it work? Did it hell. The fibres just slipped off the fabric …. could have been the bone scum! So undeterred (again) I just wrapped the blasted thing in some prefelt and rubbed until the fibres started to join. I soon got fed up with this and added some stitches to hold the whole thing together.

 

Not too bad in the end and ploughing on with the course instructions I started to draw what I’d made. This proved to be far more satisfying. Drawing is not in my comfort zone but that’s taken a bashing through out this exercise so I just went for it.

I’m actually quite pleased with the result. Keeping the bubbles white I worked at keeping the feel of contrast between the smooth, clean bubbles and the intense felt surround.


Developing this idea further I used some masking fluid to draw the bubbles onto a sheet of paper and once it had dried I painted over it with acrylic ink.


It was very wet so being impatient and not wanting to waste anything I soaked up the excess paint with one of the disaster mounded samples. 


The end result after lots of drying and rubbing of the masking fluid made me smile. I love the tones and the contrast of the void areas.


To finish the painting off I used Inktense blocks with water and a brush to darken the edges around the bubbles.


Art · MMT - Part 1 - Surface Distortion · MMT - Pt1 - Pj3 - Ex3 - Using Hot Water · MMT - Pt1 - Project 3 - Heating & Fusing · Textiles 1 - Mixed Media for Textiles

MMT – Pt1 – Pj3 – Ex3 – Using Hot Water – Part1

Polyester fabric? Uck! It’s horrible stuff but you need it for this exercise. The only other time I’ve used synthetic fabric was when using transfer paints. You do get some lovely bright images but the fabric is just so unpleasant to handle. 

I was not enthused about this exercise but I chose this one over the heating and burning exercise because I’m unsure about these as well because of the horror stories I’ve heard about harmful gasses filling up your lungs.

To start I needed to identify which fabrics in my stash were synthetic, in my memory was something about burning the edge of the material and from how it burnt or smelt you could tell if it was man made or not. In a well ventilated room I did a bit of burning, I didn’t go as far as wearing a mask, I’m not that paranoid, I did used to smoke after all.

I could smell celery, so it’s synthetic – don’t ask!!!


Next came selecting what I wanted to wrap, I have no shortage was solid items with interesting shapes. I’m a hoarder of pebbles, shells and other interesting (to me at least) ephemera.

 

All enthusiast at last I started to wrap up my items with loom bands.


I added seeds that I thought might add some colour (no chance really on synthetic material) and interesting bits of glass.


They all looked so cute wrapped up and then ready in the pan for boiling. There are more images on my instagram feed Sallyharrisonart.


I stood over the pan all excited then disaster struck. The loom bands, I’d been so proud of this time saving idea, were melting, everything was unravelling. It was a horror story in a saucepan.


Not to be defeated I whipped then out of the water and plunged them into cold water and then put them out to dry. As you can see even Gemmie wasn’t that impressed.


And in the end? Rubbish! There is some moulding and shape but it can’t even be described as subtle and delicate. It just looks weird and half hearted. Back to the drawing board then.